The Kabbalah Centre’s Charitable Endeavors

Inspiring Stories, Kabbalah

Once an esoteric study for Orthodox Jewish scholars, the Kabbalah Centre teaches Kabbalistic wisdom instead, which is about turning one’s self into a better person and helping to make the world better as well. Naturally, charity is a major component of the Kabbalah Centre’s spiritual tools they offer to students.

Kabbalah teaches that the world’s pain and suffering will end when enough people understand the secret wisdom contained in the Zohar, the books on which Kabbalah is based. To facilitate this goal, volunteers of the Zohar Project print and distribute the book to individuals and organizations in all countries. The Zohar Project has donated books to hospitals, shelters, military personal and world leaders in hopes of bringing about world peace. Scholarships are also available for people who want to attend Kabbalah classes online or in person at one of the worldwide Kabbalah Centres.

Humanitarian aid through financial donations to recognized charities is one of the Kabbalah Centre’s charitable endeavors as well. After natural disasters, such as Hurricane Sandy, the Kabbalah Centre donated to the Red Cross to support their efforts to provide food and shelter to people in the affected communities. The Kabbalah Centre also donates to charities such as Habitat for Humanity and community-based organizations that are fighting poverty and gender inequality. Since the Kabbalah Centre was founded to teach Kabbalah to all, but primarily to women, the issue of gender equality is likely close to Karen Berg’s heart. It was she who convinced her husband, Kabbalah Centre founder Philip Berg, to allow women to study Kabbalah.

Members of the Kabbalah Centre community support the independent charity, Spirituality for Kids, which offers free online classes for children. Containing the universal principles of Kabbalah, the classes are designed to give children around the world a sense of self-worth and the ability to view challenges as opportunities.

As the Kabbalah Centre teaches sharing, humility and responsibility for poverty and wars in the world as the key principles of Kabbalah, members are encouraged to leave their comfort zone to help others. Members of Kabbalah Centres are encouraged to find ways to serve in their community, which helps them become better people.

The Real Story of Yeonmi Park

Inspiring Stories

Life can be relatively easy and smooth for some people in the world. But this is not the rule for everyone, as many people who have encountered struggles such as Yeonmi Park can attest to.
Human rights activist Yeonmi Park has recently decided to come out and tell her story on an Amazon released book about her previous life in North Korea and how not everything was as glamorous as it once seemed to her. She recalls how in her younger years her life was almost in a state of bliss and that having good food and water was the happiest she could be. At the same time the word “freedom” meant nothing to her at all, until she saw just how brutal and repressive the North Korean regime led by then-leader Kim Jong-Il could be. This is what led to her and her family fleeing North Korea and enduring hardships just to get to a different country, a move that has earned serious condemnation from current ruler Kim Jong-Un. The North Korean government that appeared n the NK News has even taken to launching propaganda, suggesting that Park’s family are traitorous agents of another nation just to discredit her true story.

Yeonmi Park’s own personal life story began when she first lived in the Hyesan district of North Korea. Her mother was a nurse for the Army and her father was a civil servant for the North Korean Workers Party. Although Park enjoyed a very modest and seemingly “privileged” lifestyle at first, the family encountered struggles as she got older, her father’s imprisonment due to being accused of insider trading being a major example of this. Combined with watching a pirated movie, Park finally saw what freedom could be like, which prompted the family to leave North Korea. The family did so by first escaping into neighboring China and then fleeing to Mongolia, with the aid of many Christian missionaries and human traffickers along the way.

https://reason.com/blog/2015/11/15/yeonmi-parks-north-korean-defector-story